(Source: theseventhsister)

(Reblogged from cristalclearperfection)
Eating a vegetarian diet, walking (exercising) everyday, and meditating is considered radical. Allowing someone to slice your chest open and graft your leg veins in your heart is considered normal and conservative.
Dr Dean Ornish (via progressiveprecision)
(Reblogged from thereluctantrawfoodist)

jakiiiro:

Photographs taken inside musical instruments making them look like large and spacious rooms.

mierswa-kluska.

(Reblogged from philosoraptrix)
For the first time in my life I thought I wasn’t going to make it home. This is a nightmare. After Friday prayer we had the Day of Rage march spilling out of the mosque into the streets. We prayed upon the deceased, wrapped in shrouds at the front of the minbar, their loved ones crying out in pain and raising their hands to the sky. We drove to Ramses, where all of the protests around the country were funneling into a massive one. As soon as I started walking, I saw reporters scurrying here and there with their cameras trying to get into the mobs. Smoke was everywhere…for the first time I experienced tear gas. That stuff hurts. Your eyes water, your throat cracks, you can’t see, and the only way to relieve it is to pour pepsi into your eyes or water with yeast and breathe into a cloth. I was walking with my family into the crowd when we saw people running back, warning us not to go, they are firing live ammunition, people are dying. Helicopters are everywhere, dropping tear gas canisters. You can distinguish the crisp shots of live ammunition as opposed to the muffled blunts of the cartouche. I look up and I can see snipers atop the buildings. All of a sudden it is chaos. Everyone is running, everyone is pushing you or pulling you along; on one side there are thugs advancing upon you with sticks, on the other side are snipers and helicopters. The only thing you can do is flatten yourself against the walls of the buildings. One man lost his temper and started screaming in the middle of the streets, almost ripping his clothes off, telling us “WHY ARE YOU SCARED. THEY ARE TEN. WE ARE TEN THOUSAND. STAND YOUR GROUND.” None of the protestors were armed. No one. As we advanced ahead, more gunshots, more people with cartouche wounds in their face. Small motorcycles were operating as makeshift ambulances as they urgently puttered back and forth, each time with a different man or woman on it covered in blood, some lifeless, some screaming in pain. There aren’t enough motorcycles; some people are holding others like babies and running in the streets to the mosque which is housing injured folk. Dead bodies are being transported atop floor mats. There are mini fires on every corner of the street so as to make smoke so the helicopters don’t see clearly. As we turned to head home, we found the street we were on was blocked with thugs. We took a side alleyway, hoping it was safer. As I was walking in the quiet alley, passing by a guy making bean sandwiches, I heard a sharp rat-a-tat-tat and turned to my right. A man not one meter in front of me, RIGHT IN FRONT OF MY FACE, got shot in the head and plopped to the floor, lifeless. His brother was holding him when this happened and started shaking the man’s bloody face. He gave one last futile kick…I swear I saw his soul go out of him…and sunk like jello. His brother screamed in anguish…the deepest anguish I’ve ever seen, and threw himself at my feet. Sobbing uncontrollably, pounding at the floor like an infant, wiping his face and smearing blood everywhere. People picked him up, hugged him, kissed him, consoling him for something that couldn’t be consoled. The dead man was carried away, pools of viscous ruby red pouring out of his head on the floor. When I walked home I saw a tank with soldiers sitting on it, stoic expressions on their faces. One woman in hysterics asked them if they were content in their hearts, to which the soldier replied yes, yes I am very content. I don’t even know anymore. You can sit behind your computer screen talking politics, talking about churches or mosques or brotherhood or the STUPID word ‘islamists’ all you want…go ahead. This stuff can’t be unseen.
Eman Haggag’s personal account from today’s protests in Egypt (via memonite)
(Reblogged from memonite-deactivated20140218)

senpainoticeme:

Egyptian man writing his name on his arm for his family to find his body if he dies during the protests.

(Reblogged from religiousenpai)
(Reblogged from brutalgeneration)
We’ve created a culture that fetishizes the new(s), and we forget the wealth of human knowledge, wisdom, and transcendence that lives in the annals of what we call “history” – art, literature, philosophy, and so many things that are both timeless and incredibly timely. Our presentism bias – anchored in the belief that if it isn’t at the top of Google, it doesn’t matter, and if it isn’t Googleable at all, it doesn’t exist – perpetuates our arrogance that no one has ever grappled with the issues we’re grappling with. Which of course is tragically untrue.
(Reblogged from philosoraptrix)
In a way, you are poetry material; You are full of cloudy subtleties I am willing to spend a lifetime figuring out. Words burst in your essence and you carry their dust in the pores of your ethereal individuality.
Franz Kafka, from Letters To Milena, revised edition (Schocken, 1990)

(Source: rabbitinthemoon)

(Reblogged from wittgensteinsmister)

brutalgeneration:

Aiguille de Blaitière (by Gimpz)

(Reblogged from brutalgeneration)
(Reblogged from artchipel)

The mind which has become accustomed to the freedom and impartiality of philosophic contemplation will preserve something of the same freedom and impartiality in the world of action and emotion. It will view its purpose and desires as parts of the whole, with the absence of insistence that results from seeing them as infinitesimal fragments in a world of which all the rest is unaffected by any one man’s deeds. The impartiality which, in contemplation, is the unalloyed desire for truth, is the very same quality of mind which, in action, is justice, and in emotion is that universal love which can be given to all, and not only to those who are judged useful or admirable. Thus contemplation enlarges not only the objects of our thoughts, but also the objects of our actions and our affections: it makes us citizens of the universe, not only of one walled city at war with all the rest. In this citizenship of the universe consists man’s true freedom, and his liberation from the thraldom of narrow hopes and fears.


Thus, to sum up our discussion of the value of philosophy; Philosophy is to be studied, not for the sake of any definite answers to its questions, since no definite answers can, as a rule, be known to be true, but rather for the sake of the questions themselves; because these questions enlarge our conception of what is possible, enrich our intellectual imagination and diminish the dogmatic assurance which closes the mind against speculation; but above all because, through the greatness of the universe which philosophy contemplates, the mind also is rendered great, and becomes capable of that union with the universe which constitutes its highest good.

Bertrand Russell, The Problems of Philosophy

Chapter XV. The Value of Philosophy.

(via postmortemdecay666)
(Reblogged from postmortemdecay666)
animalcruelty-notok:

Pixar changes ending of Finding Dory, refuses to promote captivity
As a solid demonstration that art sometimes does, indeed, imitate life, the makers of the upcoming sequel in the Finding Nemo franchise have rewritten the ending of the screenplay, which originally had all the sea creatures winding up at a marine-based theme park, such as SeaWorld.
According to news reports, it was the controversial new documentary Blackfish, which excoriates SeaWorld for its captive orca program, that convinced the film’s writers and producers to change course. The sequel, Finding Dory, comes on the heels of the 2003 box office hit Finding Nemo, and is being made by Disney’s animation studio, Pixar. According to the Los Angeles Times, Pixar executives attended a private screening of Blackfish last April, with the film’s director, Gabriela Cowperthwaite.
According to the Times: “Louie Psihoyos, who directed the Oscar-winning dolphin slaughter documentary ‘The Cove,’ Pixar chief creative officer John Lasseter and ‘Dory’ director Andrew Stanton sat down with ‘Blackfish’ director Gabriela Cowperthwaite in April after seeing her movie.”
After watching the film, which “raises sharp questions about the health of whales in captivity,” the Times reported, “the studio decided to make substantial changes to the Dory script. Psihoyos told the paper that, in the early script, a number of marine mammals are dispatched to an “aquatic park/rehab facility—a SeaWorld-type environment.” The script has been altered so that the animals “now have the choice to leave that marine park,” he said. “They told Gabriela they didn’t want to look back on this film in 50 years and have it be their ‘Song of the South,’ ” the 1946 Disney musical widely considered to be racist. Pixar has declined comment, but Cowperthwaite acknowledged the screening, and said, “These are obviously people who are dedicated to researching every topic they cover. Whether Blackfish affects their creative decisions, I can’t say.” Members of the Blackfish cast were astonished by the power of an independent documentary to affect the creative plans of such a major studio.
“It’s huge and stunning that the Pixar team was moved to alter the ending of the Nemo sequel after viewing Blackfish,” says Jeffrey Ventre, a former trainer at SeaWorld Orlando who is featured in the documentary, and profiled in the 2012 book Death at SeaWorld.” “Movies like Finding Nemo are timeless, in terms of shelf life, so this is evidence of a cultural attitude shift.” Samantha Berg, another former trainer who also appears in the documentary and book, is equally impressed. “The reference to Song of the South in the article is illuminating,” she notes. “This draws a parallel between the exploitation of orcas in the entertainment industry and our tragic history of human abuse and slavery. I think someday we’ll look back on marine circuses like SeaWorld and see them as no different than the Coliseum. I’m glad Pixar recognized that highly social, intelligent beings who live human equivalent lifespans and travel 80 to 100 miles per day should not be kept in woefully inadequate facilities purely for human entertainment and profit.  I applaud Pixar for choosing not to glorify orca captivity in cartoon form.”   There has been no comment from the captive marine mammal display industry, and none are expected. But one has to wonder what the top brass are thinking right now at places like Pixar’s parent company, Disney, which holds captive dolphins at Epcot Center, and of course, at SeaWorld. After all, SeaWorld executives are stewards of a huge entertainment conglomerate, one that relies on the goodwill and respect of the public in order to keep turnstiles spinning and stockholders happy. Which begs the question, if Pixar executives don’t want to be looked back upon with shame and scorn 50 years from now for celebrating captivity (What a happy ending!), then what is going on inside the minds of people who make money from using intelligent, sentient animals—real ones, not cartoons—as a form of human entertainment?

animalcruelty-notok:

Pixar changes ending of Finding Dory, refuses to promote captivity

As a solid demonstration that art sometimes does, indeed, imitate life, the makers of the upcoming sequel in the Finding Nemo franchise have rewritten the ending of the screenplay, which originally had all the sea creatures winding up at a marine-based theme park, such as SeaWorld.

According to news reports, it was the controversial new documentary Blackfish, which excoriates SeaWorld for its captive orca program, that convinced the film’s writers and producers to change course.
 
The sequel, Finding Dory, comes on the heels of the 2003 box office hit Finding Nemo, and is being made by Disney’s animation studio, Pixar. According to the Los Angeles Times, Pixar executives attended a private screening of Blackfish last April, with the film’s director, Gabriela Cowperthwaite.

According to the Times: “Louie Psihoyos, who directed the Oscar-winning dolphin slaughter documentary ‘The Cove,’ Pixar chief creative officer John Lasseter and ‘Dory’ director Andrew Stanton sat down with ‘Blackfish’ director Gabriela Cowperthwaite in April after seeing her movie.”

After watching the film, which “raises sharp questions about the health of whales in captivity,” the Times reported, “the studio decided to make substantial changes to the Dory script.
 
Psihoyos told the paper that, in the early script, a number of marine mammals are dispatched to an “aquatic park/rehab facility—a SeaWorld-type environment.” The script has been altered so that the animals “now have the choice to leave that marine park,” he said. “They told Gabriela they didn’t want to look back on this film in 50 years and have it be their ‘Song of the South,’ ” the 1946 Disney musical widely considered to be racist.
 
Pixar has declined comment, but Cowperthwaite acknowledged the screening, and said, “These are obviously people who are dedicated to researching every topic they cover. Whether Blackfish affects their creative decisions, I can’t say.”
 
Members of the Blackfish cast were astonished by the power of an independent documentary to affect the creative plans of such a major studio.

“It’s huge and stunning that the Pixar team was moved to alter the ending of the Nemo sequel after viewing Blackfish,” says Jeffrey Ventre, a former trainer at SeaWorld Orlando who is featured in the documentary, and profiled in the 2012 book Death at SeaWorld.” “Movies like Finding Nemo are timeless, in terms of shelf life, so this is evidence of a cultural attitude shift.”
 
Samantha Berg, another former trainer who also appears in the documentary and book, is equally impressed.
 
“The reference to Song of the South in the article is illuminating,” she notes. “This draws a parallel between the exploitation of orcas in the entertainment industry and our tragic history of human abuse and slavery. I think someday we’ll look back on marine circuses like SeaWorld and see them as no different than the Coliseum. I’m glad Pixar recognized that highly social, intelligent beings who live human equivalent lifespans and travel 80 to 100 miles per day should not be kept in woefully inadequate facilities purely for human entertainment and profit.  I applaud Pixar for choosing not to glorify orca captivity in cartoon form.”  
 
There has been no comment from the captive marine mammal display industry, and none are expected. But one has to wonder what the top brass are thinking right now at places like Pixar’s parent company, Disney, which holds captive dolphins at Epcot Center, and of course, at SeaWorld. After all, SeaWorld executives are stewards of a huge entertainment conglomerate, one that relies on the goodwill and respect of the public in order to keep turnstiles spinning and stockholders happy.
 
Which begs the question, if Pixar executives don’t want to be looked back upon with shame and scorn 50 years from now for celebrating captivity (What a happy ending!), then what is going on inside the minds of people who make money from using intelligent, sentient animals—real ones, not cartoons—as a form of human entertainment?

(Reblogged from action4animals)
Not predestined for knowledge. - There is a stupid humility that is by no means rare, and those afflicted with it are altogether unfit to become votaries of knowledge. For as soon as a person of this type perceives something striking, he turns on his heel, as it were, and says to himself, ‘You have made a mistake! Where were your senses? This cannot be the truth!’ And then, instead of looking and listening more keenly again, he runs away, as if intimidated, from the striking thing and tries to shake it from his mind as fast as possible. For his inner canon says: ‘I want to see nothing that contradicts the prevalent opinion. Am I made to discover new truths? There are already too many old ones.’
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science, §25 (via epistemologicalfallacy)

(Source: outofthedarkness)

(Reblogged from epistemologicalfallacy)
But I don’t want comfort. I want poetry. I want danger. I want freedom. I want goodness. I want sin.
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World (via libranta)
(Reblogged from moonbeamsandlightning)
Airports see more sincere kisses than wedding halls. The walls of hospitals have heard more prayers than the walls of churches.
(via crimical)

(Source: recuperare)

(Reblogged from cristalclearperfection)